Review: After the Ending by Lindsey Fairleigh and Lindsey Pogue

After the Ending by Lindsey Fairleigh and Lindsey Pogue is the first in The Ending Series. A post-apocalyptic book focusing on two women.

The Virus spread. Billions died. The Ending began. We may have survived the apocalypse, but the Virus changed us.

When people started getting sick, “they” thought it was just the flu. My roommate, my boyfriend, my family…they’re all gone now. I got sick too. I should have died with them, but I didn’t. I thought witnessing the human population almost disappear off the face of the earth was the craziest thing I’d ever experience. I was wrong. My name is Dani, I’m twenty-six-years-old, and I survived The Ending.

The Virus changed everything. The world I knew is gone, and life is backwards. We’ve all had to start over. I’m someone else now—broken and changed. Other survivors’ memories and emotions haunt me. They invade my mind until I can no longer separate them from my own. I won’t let them consume me. I can’t. My name is Zoe, I’m twenty-six-years-old, and I survived The Ending.

We’ve been inseparable for most of our lives, and now our friendship is all we have left. The aftermath of the Virus has stranded us on opposite sides of the United States. Trusting strangers, making sacrifices, killing—we’ll do anything to reach one another.

This was, sadly, a bit of a disappointment.

I held out high hopes for it. It’s post-apocalyptic, which I LOVE   and I’ve always been keen on stories of female friendship, as I think it gets a pretty shoddy treatment in most media. But, while it wasn’t dreadful, it wasn’t especially good, either.

The writing was amateur. Which is fine, we all start somewhere, but it really needed a harsher edit before release, at least to get rid of most of the adverbs and the ridiculous dialogue tags. No-one says anything in this book. They all say things ‘angrily’ or they ‘chuckle’ or ‘hiss’ or ‘inform’ or ‘question’. There’s a reason that ‘said’ is industry-standard. It’s invisible.

I would have liked more description of the actual chaos and horror left in the wake of The Ending too, as I jsut didn’t feel like the world was fully imagined. Stephen King does this very well in The Stand, and while not everyone can or should write in the same way, a bit more drumming in of this would have been good. As it is, it all feels a little… easy, and unimportant. I guess I just didn’t connect.

And for a story that the description suggests is more about female friendship, the romance started way too early and was far too much a focus from the get-go.  I don’t hate romance-focussed books, but I like to know what I’m reading. Plus, the romance was pretty cliched, meaning it didn;t get that all-important wish-fulfillment aspect from me.

I think the main thing this suffered from is that it was promoted to me using one thing, and turned out to be another. I would probably have enjoyed it more had I known what I was getting. As it is, this gets a 2 out of 5.

Provided for free through Netgalley

Originally reviewed on my review blog.

anninyn

Anninyn lives and works in the UK, though she writes in a world of her own. Raised on a steady diet of sci-fi, intellectualism and political thinking by hippies, she looks at modern life through a somewhat-...unique... lens. She is obsessed with the apocalypse, and can be reached at anninyn@incaseofsurvival.com for all apocalypse-based inquiries. She is working on her first novel. You can find out about her and her other work through her website http://cbblanchard.com/

Leave a Reply