Child Labour: Rebuilding society hand by tiny little hand.

By | December 6, 2011

Post Apocalyptic living is going to be tough. Really, really tough.

I can hear you, over there, rolling your eyes, doing that irritating ‘blahblahblah’ thing while pretending your hand is a mouth. The last person who did that to me got a fork in the hand, so stop it. You done? Good.

I KNOW I’ve said it before. I KNOW I keep going on about how back-breakingly, bone-achingly hard post apocalyptic living is going to be, but I don’t think you get it yet.

This here is one of the hardest bits. You’re going to need to work, every day of your life. And so are your kids.

Here’s the thing. In the west we have this ridiculous idea that children shouldn’t be part of the workforce. It’s cause we’re so wealthy with lives that are easy compared to other parts of the world. We romanticise childhood to the point that they don’t even get punished for doing something wrong any more. It’s sick. And post apocalypse, it’s stupid.

Now, bear in mind, I’m not saying we should return to the victorian era, with kids getting maimed for life because their little hands could fit into the machines more easily. (Although, kids do have really little hands. If you need to defuse a bomb, that could be useful.) I’m just saying that keeping them in this artificial and elongated state of innocence isn’t really going to be possible.

From the point they can form complex sentences, they probably need to be working. Everyone needs to pull their weight, post apocalypse. You can’t have any freeloaders.

You may be looking at your little shitbag screaming crotchfruit adorable kid right now and wondering what on earth they can do.

Lots. They can do lots. Not as much, or the same things as adults for sure, but they can help you work the fields, herd the animals, keep tallies of your population, learn how to use weapons, sell your goods to traders – all things kids were required to do in pre industrial society.

But what they can do will depend on the apocalypse type etc. The main thing is: stop thinking your kidis special. Start remembering your kid will have to pay its way.

And if you get a ‘my preshus snowflake angel’ mombie in your compound – beat it out of her.

Come on, you’ve been wanting to do that for years. Now you have an excuse.

Category: Apocalyptic Living Post-Apocalypse People Tags: , , , , ,

About anninyn

Anninyn lives and works in the UK, though she writes in a world of her own. Raised on a steady diet of sci-fi, intellectualism and political thinking by hippies, she looks at modern life through a somewhat-...unique... lens. She is obsessed with the apocalypse, and can be reached at anninyn@incaseofsurvival.com for all apocalypse-based inquiries. She is working on her first novel. You can find out about her and her other work through her website http://cbblanchard.weebly.com/

4 thoughts on “Child Labour: Rebuilding society hand by tiny little hand.

  1. Eric Satchwill

    Any eventual wee ones of mine will be raised with this in mind, I’m thinking. Even without the apocalypse, it just makes sense from a ‘respect your kid as a person’ stand point. Respect them, they’ll respect themselves, and (hopefully) feel less entitled.

    And of course, when the apocalypse does come, they’ll be thankful ;)

    Reply
    1. tavia.

      I think it’s important that they grow up realizing that thing don’t get done unless people do them. And most importantly, they’re going to need to be the one’s doing most of the things they want to see done.

      It’s silly when I see six-year-olds in stroller and being fed because it’s easier for them to be dependent and placated than tray and fail and get frustrated until they can do it on their own. It’s a waste of everyone’s time and training to become a useless adult that no one will like.

      Reply
      1. anninyn Post author

        By the age of five my mum made me walk everywhere. She took the pushchair in case I got really tired. Now? I can walk 15 miles without stressing.

        Kids are incomplete humans, They learn what they’re taught. And if they’re taught to be helpless and let other people do their work for them, guess what they’ll do in adulthood?

        Reply
  2. Char

    This is only partly related…but some of the moms in my mom’s group were shocked and appalled when they found out I was disciplining my one-year-old. They were disgusted to discover that I was–gasp!–putting her in time out when she did something stupid/bad/wrong/painful to others/mean. But I figured she had to learn not to do those things.

    Silly me. Apparently I needed to “let my kid do whatever” because she “was still so young” so she “didn’t need to be disciplined yet.”

    I suspect those will the preshus snowflake moms.

    And no, I’m not part of that mom’s group anymore.

    Reply

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