Fiction Review: Bitter Harvest by Kim Knox

By | March 21, 2012

Bitter Harvest By Kim Knox 1

It’s 2050, and humans are an endangered species. Lieutenant Robert Sutton has survived the collapse of civilization by luck, his wits, and a chance mutation that makes him immune to the nano-virus that has wiped out millions. Now, his compound of survivors is surrounded by the infected, who are driven by the need to spread the contagion through sex. It is only a matter of time before they attack. So when Sutton is assigned to interrogate a prisoner who claims to have overcome the infection, he immediately suspects a trap…

Nicholas Rider may have survived the virus, but he’s a changed man, ruled by his desires. But his need for Sutton is different. Rider craves an end to his overwhelming needs, and Sutton could be the man to do it.

Secure in his belief that he’s invulnerable, Sutton can’t understand or resist his intense attraction to his prisoner. Will Rider be his downfall-or his savior?

 

As if you couldn’t tell by the cover and description, this is post-apocalyptic erotica, featuring gay sex. As a result, the review will cover these things. NSFW.

A major complaint about erotica, especially erotica that ties in other genres like sci-fi, is that the plot suffers and exists only as a vehicle for the sex scenes. This is partly true for Bitter Harvest, in that the details of the plot could only really exist in erotic literature – a combination of genetic research and insane AI has infected humanity with an almost insectile ‘conformity’, which is spread through sex, the infected having a very intense and almost irresistable pheremone signature – but in general, the plot would be a perfectly competent sci-fi plot outside of the expertly written and effective sex scenes. Nothing ground-breaking, but hey, I don’t want ground-breaking and mind-expanding in my masturbation fodder, thanks.

It’s another short one- only 30,000 words – so is a quick read for someone wanting hot gay men fucking in a well-described post-apocalyptic world. A few complaints from me which can be ignored in the light of the genre (everyone is bisexual to a ridiculous degree, even if the only sex scenes you get are between men. If I was in control of one of the few compounds of living human beings left I wouldn’t be quite so approving of everyone having sex with everyone, for obvious reasons.)

I said up there that the sex scenes were expertly written and effective, and this is more than true. There are only a few of them, but the consistent sexual tension between the leads is very believable, and if the ending seems a little quick and too easy, hey, it’s only 30,000 words. What can you expect?

In short, an effective erotica with a decent (and oddly unique) post-apocalyptic setting. 4/5.

  1. Provided for review by Carina Press

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